New Boat advice

Discussion in 'Boat Talk' started by SCsurfin21, Oct 2, 2014.

  1. SCsurfin21

    SCsurfin21 Member

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    Hey guys. I am looking for a new boat to get in on the crazy fishing action. I started fishing the surf awhile back. I have a lot of experience fishing lakes off my family boat (not an ocean boat). I've always wanted to get out on the ocean, do some inshore fishing, maybe run to the islands, but nothing further than that, and mostly on calm days. I want a walk around because it suits my family a bit, allows my girlfriend to get out of the sun and lay down. But I don't have enough to buy that right now, and I'd rather get a boat to learn the ocean's ropes thats less expensive so if I hit the docks or whatever, I'm not freaking out. I like center consoles for fishing, would love a walk around for a good price. Are cuddy cabin's good for fishing or do they lack room? It also needs to be fairly lightweight. I drive a v6 4x4 Tacoma with 6500lbs max tow.

    That being said, whats a good boat thats anywhere from 17ft to about 21ft that would be a good inshore/island hopping boat for around $10,000? I've seen a few Boston Whalers for closer to 15,000 but are pretty old and thats a lot of money for a 35 year old boat that would need work. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

    BTW I live in Simi Valley, would be going out of Channel Islands Harbor or Ventura Harbor, and would stick mostly towards malibu area or go up towards santa barbara. Occasionally going to the islands.

    Thanks guys ahead of time!

    Would also like a turn key boat to get in on the fishing action as soon as possible.
     
  2. Carnivore

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    A learning boat is just that. Find one that fits your budget as quality isn't important if you plan on dumping it in a few years. In fact the cheaper the better. Pretty much any boat will have the quality you will need. Boats like Grady White, Boston, skip jack and Radon You are paying for outstanding hulls, that is whey they are so much. You really get what you pay for.

    In the 18' range I wouldn't make a run to the islands. Remember it isn't what weather you go out on it is what it turns into that is the problem. If you do plan on heading in before noon as that is usually the magic hour where the channel starts to turn if it is going to.

    Walk arounds are great for overnight runs, and are usually dryer depending on the set up when running. They are harder to get around and though fishing on the front has it's advantages (up higher for casting) it is much harder to fight bigger fish when you have to walk around the boat. With kids it gives a better place for them to play and it does afford a place out of the sun.

    Obviously center consoles are the exact opposite of the above. Meant much more for the hard core fisherman, same day runs, lighter for towing, etc.

    I wouldn't go much bigger then a 18 with that tow vehicle, it is lacking weight to control the load. You can avoid the grade by going out the 118 but still, I wouldn't recommend it.
     
  3. SCsurfin21

    SCsurfin21 Member

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    So basically anything that runs will work? Should I still bother with the boat survey? I have a mechanic in my family that would check the engine.

    http://ventura.craigslist.org/boa/4656920774.html
    Would something like this be worth the investment or should I look for something smaller and a little less work?
     
  4. wils

    wils Well-Known Member

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    Learning boats...
    do you have any friends with a boat who can teach you some hands-on basics?

    Boats in the ocean.....
    look into a coast guard auxiliary course.
    take your first boat to a local lake FIRST to get acquainted with it.
    stay local your first couple of times out. 11AM to 1PM would be a good window - late morning "nice" followed by early afternoon "breezes"

    survey...
    have the owner take you on a sea trial.
    have a mechanic check out the motor and outdrive. cheap boats can QUICKLY turn into expensive driveway furniture

    fishing....
    go on a couple local all-day boats and talk with the deckies about your future plans.
    do you have any friends who are familiar fishing the local areas

    "investment".....good luck with that outlook.
     
  5. SCsurfin21

    SCsurfin21 Member

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    I have a family member that used to own an ocean fishing boat before the economy tanked. I am going to talk to him about teaching me the ways when I end up getting the boat. I will probably go out on a charter sometime here soon to fish and ask some questions.

    As for investment, I don't expect to make any money, or even get back what I put in. I just say investment because its a chunk of money to put into anything. Ha. B.O.A.T. only means break out another thousand right? LOL

    Are seamanship classes worth it? From what I've read, the best thing to do is just get out there, but if those classes are valuable learning, I'm willing to spend that extra cash.

    Thank you for your response.:beerbang:
     
  6. phishy

    phishy Well-Known Member

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    Its better to know someone with a boat..become his best buddy and boat ho...then to actually own your own.
    Should stop by and check mine out when u get time..
     
  7. SCsurfin21

    SCsurfin21 Member

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    Yeah. I'll try to stop by either this weekend or next. Should I look for an outboard or an I/o? Are outboard easier to maintain or are inboards easier?
     
  8. Carnivore

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    Not a bad looking ride if it works well. Definitely a sea trial is in order to make sure everything works.

    Check belts, hoses look for and leaks around the motor. When were the manifolds last changed, These go out and are expensive to fix and A PAIN!!! but a necessary part of the motor or it over heats and BOOM.

    Find out the motor maker Ford distributor up front of motor, Chevy back. If a 6 cylinder it could be anything so find out builder mercury, OMC etc. Looks like a merc from the color of the outdrive. Make sure it doesn't CLUNK into gear, that it works smooth, no shuttering of the motor or really funny noises. Steering is good and smooth. pull the top outdrive drain plug and see if it is milky or low. Milky means bad seals and could be a very expensive repair. Pull the motor oil dipstick to see if water is in it too. Milky or water droplets means run.

    *Edit* forgot, make sure the floors are not spongy to walk on. If they are then don't bother. Dry rot in older boats happens because the wood used wasn't always treated.

    Survey, eh your choice. I would bet that on a boat that old there will be some issues. You can look for major bubbling in the hull meaning the lamination is coming apart or it has spent to much time soaking in water. Pictures don't look like it has though. New trailer, check the wheel hubs when they stop for heat. Real hot means new hubs or breaks or both. Hubs are cheap, breaks...no as cheep.

    Personally I wouldn't go much above 3,500 but that is me.

    Boating course, worth while if you are starting out. Will go over all the safety gear you will need. Basic navigation and rules of the ocean.

    Inboard or outboard, personal choice. Inboards tend to need more work but are cheaper in parts, out the opposite. I like outboards as it is easier to repair, replace stuff but that is just me. Not a Johnson fan for the bigger motors they tend to have fuel problems. Mercs a bit better. Honda and the ones I love in the older ones. Mid 90s Yamaha. Newer Yama, and Etecs are the hot tickets with Honda (heaver) and mercs taking up the lower positions.

    Phishy is right though, boats are expensive and a labor of love. If you can ho with someone you are much better off and you can learn quit a bit to make your own decision. It is nice though to just jump in the boat and go where you want. That comes at a price though.
     
    #8 Carnivore, Oct 3, 2014 at 10:31 PM
    Last edited: Oct 3, 2014
  9. SCsurfin21

    SCsurfin21 Member

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    Thanks so much all of you for the information. I'm going to keep my eyes peeled for a good deal. If I have any other questions, I'll let you know. If I get anything. I'll post some pictures. Thanks again for the help!!!
     
  10. SCsurfin21

    SCsurfin21 Member

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    Hey guys, so turns out that boat I posted above has some major soft spots. Not wanting to get into something that intense as I don't have any fiberglassing experience. I did talk to a guy about a 232 Sportcraft. I don't know what year. Forgot to ask. He wants 5000 for it but it needs some work. I might go check it out and see what this "work" consists of for $5000.

    It is an inboard engine, though, with a rudder to steer. Not an I/O. is this something I should stay away from as a beginner? I hear they are harder to maneuver and have a higher learning curve to them. I have driven I/O many times, but never a straight inboard.

    Also, he says the engine needs some work. My uncle says we can rebuild it fairly easy if the parts are all there and it hasn't thrown a rod or something major. If it did, how hard and costly would a repower be? Just trying to decide whether or not it is even worth it to go check it out.

    thanks.
     
  11. wils

    wils Well-Known Member

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    Did you see Mitch over the weekend?
     
  12. SCsurfin21

    SCsurfin21 Member

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    I'm going to try to get over there this weekend. Brother just had a baby and his wife had some complications, so I've been helping them out.
     
  13. Carnivore

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    As a beginner I would stay far away from a rudder steering boat. They correct slow going forward and hardly at all going back.

    Another thing I don't remember you covering in your posts, do you have a place to keep it or store it? take into consideration when buying where it will be stored, how much and how good of shape the trailer is in and a place you can do routine maintenance. Bearings, seals, wiring etc.

    I would hate to see you get into this to far and then have that set of issues come up.
     
  14. SCsurfin21

    SCsurfin21 Member

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    Yeah. I have family with some land that said I could keep it there. I could even build some type of structure over it if needed. It also has plenty of room to work on it.

    One question. I've been looking on craigslist, boat trader, bloody decks, and here in the classifieds. Is there anywhere else I should be checking for boats for sale?

    Thanks again for all the help you guys have been giving!
     
  15. sourcreamnjive

    sourcreamnjive Well-Known Member

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    anything that says needs work you need to stay away from!
     
  16. SCsurfin21

    SCsurfin21 Member

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    Even if its just cosmetic? Or does cosmetic damage just show the tip of the iceberg ? I found a Boston whaler. That just looks dirty. But the center console is propped to one side with a stick. I'll see if I can find the link again.

    Edit: I found the Link, but just realized from the ad that the price is firm and I won't pay what hes asking for that specific boat. And it looks like there are pieces missing. I'll keep looking.
     
    #16 SCsurfin21, Oct 7, 2014 at 6:15 AM
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2014
  17. sourcreamnjive

    sourcreamnjive Well-Known Member

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    I got a boat on trade, it posted it needs stuff: 2nd battery for trolling motor, anchor, PFD's, bilge pump, new gas line with bulb, new starter teeth, new trailer roller.....minor stuff like this I can deal with.
     
  18. SCsurfin21

    SCsurfin21 Member

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    Ah okay. So I don't want to get into something that needs engine work or the deck rebuilt, or anything really major. But something that just needs some minor fixes like an engine tune up and normal maintenance stuff should be better.

    I'm starting to think this boat is going to be a little longer term than just a learner boat. Looking at the prices, I probably won't be able to get a bigger, newer boat (21-24ft, year 2000 or newer) for awhile. So would it be more worthwhile to get a boat in the, say $5000 range and put the work into it to make it nice, or to spend like around $10000 and get a boat that is a little newer, needs less work, and will I won't want to move up from for a while? Obviously the unexpected will happen, but that is regardless of what boat I get and am taking that into account. Or would it be better to just keep saving the money and buy one when I get there. The only thing that makes me hesitate on still saving is because I will be getting to know the ocean and making the beginner mistakes in a $25,000 vs. a 5 or 10,000 boat.

    I really respect you guys' opinion. So thank you for all your input. I really can't express how appreciative I am of all your continuous help.
     
  19. Carnivore

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    You have to ask yourself these..

    1) how much experience do you have working on boats or cars etc?
    2) how much time do you have extra to work on it?
    3) how soon do you want to use it?
    4) how much money do you realistically have to spend?
    5) do you like tinkering with things or not?
    6) are you willing to have a trip or 2 canceled because something goes wrong with your "fix"?

    Because I don't know what you are thinking personally, I can't say which way is better. For a fixer upper first take how much it will cost to buy it...hold on to that a second. Now realistically think of how much you will spend on it to get it where you want it. Now at the very least DOUBLE that and honestly triple that. Now add that to the price of the boat and you have how much roughly you will spend to get it on the water.

    A little story. I needed new hubs and brakes for my boat trailer. 2 axle set up and converting to disk brakes. I figured 500 total and a weeks work. I am on week 3 and just over 1150.... that is just the stupid trailer. Now I just have to bleed the brakes and it is done but that is what happens when money, life, work etc gets in the way...now add I am SINGLE so no wife and kids to deal with.

    Just spent a year and a half rewiring the thing after an electrical fire. Ran like a top last weekend.

    Now this is a top notch boat but things just take longer to get done when life happens. How long do you have and how soon do you want it? Think about it before getting a fixer upper.
     
  20. wils

    wils Well-Known Member

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    aw what the heck.

    the internet is fine for anonymous ramblings. real life is where the real learning is at.....

    "just jump in; the waters fine"
     

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