When to replace the epoxy on guides

Discussion in 'Rod Building' started by dballisloose, Oct 19, 2010.

  1. dballisloose

    dballisloose Member

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    About 15 years ago, as a teenager, I built a couple nice saltwater rods for myself. Getting back into fishing, I pulled them out this weekend and see that the epoxy around the feet of the guides has cracked a little, probably due to time and use as the rods were bent. When is the right time to replace the epoxy and/or can more just be added over the top without having to replace what's there?
     
  2. mogambosquid

    mogambosquid Well-Known Member

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    You can put a thin coat over the top no problem. I would definitely prep/clean the old epoxy by going over the old epoxy with a green scotchbrite pad or 400+ grit wet sand paper, and lots of water to break the gloss a bit so you get a good bond with the new coat. After the scotchbrite treatment, wipe the wraps down with some acetone or 100% ethanol, let dry and recoat.
     
  3. Top Shot

    Top Shot Gold Coast Lady Anglers

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    Greg gave you some great advice....I would prep the old and apply a new coat also.
     
  4. bowhunter29

    bowhunter29 Active Member

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    One bit of advice, never clean with acetone or alcohol as your last step. It should be your first step followed by sanding or using a scotchbrite pad. Then, use a soft-bristled brush to wipe off the dust. Finally, recoat your wraps. If you use a solvent on your rod right before you epoxy over it, you can get some wicked fisheyes if you aren't very carefull!

    jeremy
     
  5. Flipper

    Moderator

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    Great advice guys.. and yes, like bowhunter said, use the alcohol first. Clean good around all areas, including the lower end of the guide feet. Then lite-sand and brush dry. A can of dust-off for cleaning computers/keyboards will work good too for getting the sanding dust off afterword.

    Be sure not to mix your guide coat (flex-coat) too hot or to big a batch... and do not heat, or it will crack in the same way the first time you bend the rod.
     
  6. Master Chief

    Master Chief Active Member

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    I personally have Flex-Coat and Diamond II, If I were doing a rework like this I would definately go with the D2 epoxy. It sets up and is more durable than the flexcoat (at least in my opinion)
     

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